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Disability

Queen Mary is committed to being inclusive and accessible to disabled people. We recognise that disabled people are a diverse group with differing needs. Some disabilities are not always visible, such as mental health issues, HIV and epilepsy.

Accessibility for our staff will ensure that we attract and retain the most talented people to contribute to the success of Queen Mary.

Definition of disability under the Equality Act 2010

Under the Equality Act 2010 you are disabled if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities. 

What ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ mean? 

  • ‘substantial’ is more than minor or trivial, e.g. it takes much longer than it usually would to complete a daily task like getting dressed.

  • ‘long-term’ means 12 months or more, e.g. a breathing condition that develops as a result of a lung infection

What is covered by the Equality Act 2010?

The legislation says that you must not be discriminated against because:

  • You have a disability.

  • Someone thinks you have a particular disability. This is known as discrimination by perception.

  • You are connected to someone with a disability. This is known as discrimination by association. 

  • You are also covered by the Act if you have a progressive condition like HIV, cancer and multiple sclerosis, even if you are currently able to carry out normal day to day activities. You are protected as soon as you are diagnosed with a progressive condition.

  • You are also covered by the Act if you had a disability in the past. 

  • For example, if you had a mental health condition in the past which lasted for over 12 months, but you have now recovered, you are still protected from discrimination because of that disability.

  • You are also covered by the Act if you had a disability in the past. 

  • For example, if you had a mental health condition in the past which lasted for over 12 months, but you have now recovered, you are still protected from discrimination because of that disability.
  • People are not protected from discrimination on the grounds that they do not have a disability. So it is not discrimination to treat a disabled person more favourably than someone who is not disabled or someone who does not have the same disability.

Reasonable adjustments

Employers are legally obligated to make reasonable adjustments to ensure employees with disabilities are not substantially disadvantaged when carrying out their jobs.

A reasonable adjustment is a change to a work process, practice, procedure or environment that enables an employee with a disability to perform their job in a way that minimises substantial disadvantage to their disability, or physical or mental health conditions.

This applies to all workers, including trainees, apprentices, contract workers and business partners.

Examples of reasonable adjustments could include:

  • Flexible working hours.

  • Making changes to the recruitment process so a candidate can be considered for a job.

  • Doing things in another way, such as allowing someone with social anxiety disorder to have their own desk instead of hot-desking.

  • Making physical changes to the workplace, like installing a ramp for a wheelchair user or an audio-visual fire alarm for a deaf person.

  • Changing equipment, for instance providing a special keyboard if an employee has arthritis of the hand.

  • Allowing employees who become disabled to make a phased return to work, including flexible hours or part-time working.

  • Offering employees training opportunities.

Access to work

If the help you need at work is not covered by Queen Mary, for example special equipment, adaptations or support worker services to help you do things like answer the phone or go to meetings, help getting to and from work. You may be able to get assistance from Access to Work, a Government initiative aimed at supporting disabled people and those with long term physical or mental health conditions, to take up or remain in their job.

For further information visit: Access to Work.

Your HR Partner will be able to provide advice on making a claim through Access to Work.

Pre-employment screening

Occupational Health provide confidential pre-employment health screening service, which is fully compliant with the Equality Act 2010. For further details visit: http://hr.qmul.ac.uk/about-us/pre-employment-screening/

Building Access

For full access and route guides to all QMUL campuses visit: AccessAble.

Emergency evacuation of disabled people

Please see the: Guidance for Emergency Evacuation of Disabled People.

 

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