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Gender Pay Reporting

Our commitment to gender equality

Queen Mary is committed to reduce our gender pay gap and we have detailed existing and proposed initiatives that will help us achieve this aim. We also have plans to conduct further research and reporting to understand better how we can equalise the proportions of male and female staff at every level, and the pay and bonuses they are awarded throughout their careers. This will be an evolving process and following our first report published today, we will continue to report on an annual basis to map our progress. We will also keep staff up to date with individual initiatives and activities throughout the year. 

We also have plans to conduct further research and reporting to understand better how we can equalise the proportions of male and female staff at every level, and the pay and bonuses they are awarded throughout their careers. This will be an evolving process and we will report on an annual basis to map our progress, and keep staff up to date with individual initiatives and activities throughout the year. The full report is below:

QMUL Gender Pay Gap Report 2017 - 18 [PDF 529KB]

If you have any feedback or questions about the report or the gender pay gap at Queen Mary, please email hr-equality@qmul.ac.uk

About us:

Universities are all about people; everyone at Queen Mary has a role to play in pushing the boundaries of knowledge and providing excellent teaching and learning, whether they fulfil academic or professional duties. We all work together to create opportunities for the next generation, tackle global challenges, contribute to cultural development and create social and economic benefits. 

At the time of the data capture for this report, we employed over 5,300 members of staff, in a variety of professional or academic roles, with an overall gender split of 48 percent male and 52 percent female. We are proud to employ staff from our local area, and from all over the UK and the world, making our campuses some of the most diverse areas in London.

We work hard to provide a collegial environment with opportunities for individuals to advance professionally and academically. We are proud to be the first higher education institution in the UK to pay the London Living Wage. Our institution is also part of the Athena SWAN Charter, which at Queen Mary, doesn’t just address barriers to progression that affect women, but also recognises that individuals have identities shaped by several different factors and encourages the consideration of the intersection of gender and other factors wherever possible.

Pay and proportion of female and male staff at each pay level

Mean (average) pay gap:  21.7 per cent                   

Median (middle) pay gap: 15 per cent

Proportion of males and females in pay quartiles:

Quartiles

Female

(%)

Male

(%)

4 (highest paid) Includes all employees whose standard hourly rate places them within the upper quartile

36

64

3  Includes all employees whose standard hourly rate places them above the median and below the upper quartile

50

50

2  Includes all employees whose standard hourly rate places them above the lower quartile and below the median

56

44

1 (lowest paid) Includes all employees whose standard hourly rate places them within the lower quartile

64

36


Our initial investigations into these gaps shows us that most of the lower grade roles at Queen Mary are filled by females in roles such as cleaning and catering, lower-grade administrative roles, research and teaching assistants, and that a higher proportion of males are in senior, higher salaried academic roles – particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. At the time of the data capture, we were also paying high hourly rates to some males to deliver some specialist lectures.

We will…

  • We are committed to improving female career progression opportunities across the organisation. We have three programmes for staff that we will promote more heavily: Women’s Mentoring Schemes have been set up to encourage women into more senior academic roles; the Aurora Women’s Leadership Programme Women supports women in both academic and Professional Services roles; and the Women into Leadership Programme is for Professional Services and academic staff.
  • We have introduced Unconscious Bias training for all our staff, with it being mandatory for those in specific roles, in order to help limit the impact of unconscious bias has on key decisions with Queen Mary.
  • We are encouraging applications from the under-represented genders to address gender imbalance at lower grades.
  • Data relating to the gender pay gap is being shared with the Gender Equality Self-Assessment Team (GESAT), and the Chairs of Athena SWAN[1] self-assessment teams so that local Athena SWAN applications and action plans cover can help address these issues at a local level, within groups already formed to tackle female underrepresentation.
  • We will carry out an equal pay audit that will look in more detail at matters such as gender pay gaps by grade or department.
  • Through our public engagement work in our local communities, we have endeavoured to address gender pay at the societal level by encouraging all members of our communities to consider higher education and fulfil their potential.

We propose to look at the following areas, in consultation and collaboration with our staff…

  • Examine institutional trends for gender bias in processes such as recruitment, induction, promotion, exit interviews and flexible working to identify any barriers to gender equality and inform priorities for action in 2018.
  • Review the appointment procedure for external experts, so that the university employs an equal split of male and female staff.
  • Examine more data and review other institutional policies that relate to what we think are associated factors that can create barriers for women, to include: workload allocation, our flexible working policy; our policies on bonus payments; and we could include our pay gap figures for ethnicity and disability in future reporting.
  • Revise recruitment and selection policy which would, among other things, promote our guidelines on gender balance on interview panels and promotion and bonus committees

[1] Athena SWAN is a framework against which Higher Education Institutions measure their commitment to gender equality.

Bonuses

Mean (average) bonus gap:

49.3 per cent including National Clinical Excellence Awards

13.8 per cent excluding National Clinical Excellence Awards

Median (middle) bonus gap:

50 per cent including National Clinical Excellence Awards

0 per cent excluding National Clinical Excellence Awards

Proportion of males/females receiving a bonus including National Clinical Excellence Awards:

12.3 per cent male / 6.4 per cent female

Proportion of males/females receiving a bonus not including National Clinical Excellence Awards:

3.3 per cent male / 5.6 per cent female

We pay bonuses in three different processes: the Staff Bonus Scheme (mostly for professional staff) and the Professorial Review (mostly for academic staff) are determined within Queen Mary, and we also apply bonuses made to clinical staff via the NHS’s National Clinical Excellence Awards (NCEA). There is a large skew in favour of men for staff applicable for the NCEAs. For the two bonus schemes determined within Queen Mary, we can see there is still a gap. This is due to there being higher bonuses available through the Professorial Review, and there being more males in this group of staff.

We will…

  • Investigate the gender bias in career progression for academic staff in order to equalise the Professorial population.
  • Support more professional and academic women in their career progression and applications for bonuses through our existing programmes called Women’s Mentoring Scheme and the Aurora Women’s Leadership Programme.
  • Collaborate with colleagues in NHS Trusts to explore the gender imbalance within the National Clinical Excellence awards.
  • Look at ways to help more of our female staff to apply and receive the National Clinical Excellence awards.

More about what we propose to do is covered in the section above.

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